More than 30 organizations supported this document directed to the senators from the province of Córdoba, Laura Rodríguez Machado, Carlos Caserio and Ernesto Martínez. The document highlights the importance of their vote in favor of the abortion bill under discussion and that has already been approved by the Chamber of Deputies.

“Below, we offer a google translate version of the original article in Spanish. This translation may not be accurate but serves as a general presentation of the article. For more accurate information, please switch to the Spanish version of the website. In addition, feel free to directly contact in English the person mentioned at the bottom of this article with regards to this topic”.

Given some expressions of the senators and the senator in front of this debate, in which they stated that they would adopt a different position, presenting their own project, many civil society organizations consider it important to present arguments to highlight the reasons why we understand that their vote should be in support of a bill, as approved by the lower house.

In the first place, this project is constitutional and respects the provisions of the International Treaties on Human Rights to which the Argentine State is bound. Neither the National Constitution nor the human rights treaties ratified by the Argentine State are an obstacle to the decriminalization and legalization of abortion, so it is possible to uphold the constitutionality and conventionality of the bill. In fact, these norms impose on the State obligations of respect, protection and guarantee of rights that are guaranteed in this project.

In addition, we argue that conscientious objection can not be institutional. The objection of individual conscience, as it is raised in the bill, is a reasonable solution based on freedom of conscience and religion. However, recognizing the claim of private institutions to exempt themselves from the provision of services for the interruption of pregnancy is unthinkable, taking into account the restrictions that the freedom of individual conscience of the professionals working in these establishments generates, the affectation of freedom and right to the health of the patients, and the costs and problems for the health system.

On the other hand, we present arguments to argue that the 14-week term is a reasonable term. Allowing the voluntary interruption of pregnancy up to this time does not imply risks and is in line with what is regulated by other countries that have been improving their regulatory frameworks.

It is also important to mention that the legalization of abortion does not matter a budgetary problem. The costs of a legal practice are much lower than the costs implied by complications from unsafe abortions that range from surgical interventions with hospitalization and anesthesia to several days in intensive care.

Finally, we consider that this bill of voluntary interruption of pregnancy is consistent with the totality of the current regulatory system and is the missing law in a remarkable list of regulations on human rights in our country.

But fundamentally, we highlight the broad support that this bill has in the province of Córdoba. A million people gather in front of Congress and thousands in the streets throughout the country. In Córdoba, capital and in numerous provincial towns, we find ourselves in a massive way in each pañuelazo, expressing our position.

It can not be denied that the sanction of this law is expected by the Cordoba’s people, the Argentine citizenship and the Latin American community.

The senators have the opportunity to turn this project into law, consolidate long-postponed human rights, meet the international standards in this matter to which the Argentine State is obliged and mark an advance in the protection of women’s rights. and pregnant people in our country.

The bill will allow us to advance in the construction of a more just, egalitarian and respectful society of human rights.

Senators: let it be law

More information

Publication: Senators: let it be law

Contact

Mayca Balaguer, [email protected]